Archive for November 9th, 2010

TRAVEL RESTRICTED IN SINALOA AND SONORA

November 9, 2010

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El Diario de Juarez (Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua) 11-8-10

United States restricts trips in Sinaloa and Sonora

Mexico, D.F. – The U.S. Consulate in Hermosillo, Sonora, announced new travel restrictions for U.S. employees in the states of Sonora and Sinaloa.

In a message released by the consulate, all travel by U.S. employees on the Benito Juarez Highway from Don Station (near Huatabampo & Navojoa) to Guamuchil, Sinaloa, is prohibited due to threats and extreme violence.

U.S. employees need to travel in armored vehicles in the rest of Sinaloa due to the influence of drug cartels and frequent gun battles between cartels. The consulate issued an exception for travel in Mazatlan, although no explanation for the exception was given.

In Hermosillo, the capital city of Sonora, the U.S. Consul said the use of armored vehicles is required south of Ciudad Obregon and travel is prohibited south of Navojoa and in the mountainous regions of the state.

U.S. personnel must also travel in armored vehicles in areas around Nogales, Sonora, due to “generalized violence” and “active narcotics traffic in the northern part of Sonora.”

U.S. employees who travel between Nogales, Sonora and Hermosillo, Sonora, may do so only in private vehicles and only during daylight hours on Mexican Highway 15.

http://www.diario.com.mx/notas.php?f=2010/11/08&id=84926db498a21957b8c109a5a1088c3e

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El Imparcial (Hermosillo, Sonora) 11-8-10

Inter-America Press Society asked to equip journalists

Merida, Yucatan –SUN- Mexican communications media needs to equip journalists to deal with the violence that confronts them which has resulted in the deaths of 65 reporters since the year 2000, according to Patricia Mercado, Editorial Director of Imagen, in Zacatecas.

In the 66th Assembly of the Interamerican Press Society (SIP), which will run through tomorrow in Merida, Mercado states that the Mexican media is not prepared to deal with the level of violence currently present in this country.

Mercado maintains that better security for reporters can be obtained by practicing utmost professionalism while confronting attacks (against the media) by drug cartels.

Mercado noted that besides the 65 murders of reporters since 2000, 12 reporters have disappeared since 2005, and none of those cases (the murders or the disappearances) have been solved.

The editorialist denounced self-censoring that is practiced among the media in Mexico, where there are prohibited themes and reporters have to refrain from signing their names to stories.

http://www.elimparcial.com/EdicionEnLinea/Notas/Nacional/08112010/
477988.aspx

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In Sonora there are at least 13,000 young “ninis”

Hermosillo – In Sonora there are at least 13,000 young people who “neither” study “nor” work and who are commonly known as “ninis”. They range in age from 12 to 29 years of age, according to the Sonoran Youth Institute (ISJ).

The Director of ISJ, Jose Everado Lopez Cordova said that the condition of the youth is a concern of the Institute all over that state, and that it does not want the number of “ninis” to increase.

“The theme of the “ninis” is one found in Spain that has been adopted here in which there are young people who neither study nor work and that is the reason the governments (of Spain and Mexico) must immediately offer work and room for improvement,” said Lopez.

“The state government allocated a fund of 50 million pesos for youths aged 18 to 35,” said Lopez Cordova, “with the intent that they start their own businesses with credit from 125,000 to 500,000 pesos.”

Valentin Castillo Garzon, President of the Employer’s Association (COPERMEX) said that the lack of education and employment opportunities is the fundamental reason for the “ninis.”

Sociologist Marco Antonio Lopez Ochoa said there needs to be an investigation into the “ninis” that have already reached 13,000 and that the existence of the “ninis” should worry everybody.

http://www.elimparcial.com/EdicionEnLinea/Notas/Noticias/08112010/
477930.aspx

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-end of report-


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